The accepted knowledge is that Diabetes destroys gradually over years. Ketosis Prone Type 2 diabetes is an acute form of type 2. This type 2 can reach fasting blood sugars of 300 or higher in months. This blog brings together all the documentation that I could find in the world and my speculation of what it means for KPD’s in specific and diabetics in general. I ask you to leave your stories about what happened to you so that we can all gain a better understanding of what we are dealing with.

Monday, February 11, 2013

Ethnic minorities in the U.S. have nearly twice the risk of diabetes even with low BMI's



This came across my desk from Medscape. http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/779072?src=nl_topic

Recently, the Excellence in Diabetes 2013 conference was held in Turkey. One of the big statements to come out of it was this: “ type 2 diabetes, usually associated with obesity, can occur in many seemingly thin people from ethnic minorities.”
 
"Diabetes risk is higher in all ethnic groups than in whites, and of course some of this is just due to body weight, but evidence is now building that people of many races may be at increased risk of diabetes and cancer before they are even considered conventionally overweight."

Meanwhile, Chittaranjan Yajnick, MD, from King Edward Memorial Diabetes Unit, Pune, India, also gave a talk on what makes Indians so susceptible to diabetes. "We have seen that Indians are often diagnosed with diabetes 10 years earlier and 5- to 10-units BMI thinner than whites," he noted.
Both believe the explanation lies in "hidden" visceral fat found inside the body, between organs, in Asians and probably other ethnic groups too, but not in whites. This in turn affects the levels of adipokines secreted, such as leptin and adiponectin, which can have adverse metabolic effects.
The knowledge that Asians and other ethnic groups are at much greater risk for diseases associated with obesity, such as diabetes and many cancers, than whites, is not new, Dr. Maskarinec explained. But more recently, researchers have begun to show that nonwhites who are not even particularly overweight or who are of "normal" weight are at much higher risk than whites.

"People have talked about some kind of adaptation for white people, who have had a greater number of years to adjust to the type of food we are eating now," she postulated.

What they aren’t saying is that the connection between weight gain and diabetes isn’t as tight as they thought. Most of all prescriptions for holding off diabetes suggest that the key is healthy eating and exercise. This, I think, is largely due to how Americans view being overweight, which is strongly associated with diabetes in this country. People become fat because they over eat and don’t exercise. It is the same old “gluttony and  sloth“ line.

This attitude has pervaded the science as well. The first suggestion is that thin diabetics are secret fat people. Their fat is hidden because of its visceral nature.  So the relationship still holds even if only by the slimmest of margins.

There is one thing which does, however, come through loud and clear.

Ethnic minorities that come to the U.S. and take up the standard American diet are at a very high risk of diabetes. There is something toxic in our food/environment that isn’t as widespread in the rest of world. It is becoming so though as we see in the rising rates of diabetes around the world.

People here who aren’t part of ethnic minorities tend to discount problem but they should view this as a “canary in a coal mine” situation. On some level, this is affecting everyone. We really need to quit looking at fat and start looking at what in our environment forces our bodies to put on fat.

5 comments:

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    ReplyDelete
  2. I wonder, what is exactly in the US food supply. I came to live here from Russia. The general crowd in Russia is thin, however, a lot of unhealthy foods are consumed. Health statistic is horrible, but people are much thinner.

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  3. Hi Galina

    Never expected to find you over here in the "weird" diabetes world.

    I really can't guess what exactly is in the food supply that is toxic. Most of our food is industrially processed for maximum yield with the lowest cost. There are a myriad of chemicals involved in this process. It could be anywhere. What I think is, for certain, that there is a toxic component that many of us have a strong reaction to and that a part of the reaction is the putting on of fat to act as a counter balance to the destabilizing effects of these toxins.

    This is the reason I am ramming my head against Peter's Proton series. My idea is that fat cells balance this toxicity and depending on how toxic it is for an individual they must have sufficient fat cells secreting something that offsets these effects. Fat, in this case, is a balance to a toxic load.

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  4. Hey Mike, Great blog!

    I diagnosed myself in 1996. Was at work feeling unusually tired and sleepy. I borrowed a glucometer from a co-worker and tested at 760. Went immediately to my doctor and,here I am.
    Have had a few bouts with hypoglycemia but for the most part, have had no serious effects. No visual changes or circulatory problems(thank God). I take glucophage 500mg. Twice daily. Have cut carbs and use only canola or olive oil. Also use cinnamin in my coffee everyday. my dad had a circulation ulcer that never healed. The weird thing is that he was not dibetic. Just goes to show you.

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  5. We all know what the problem is: Too much sugar, something we were not evolved to handle in our diets whether your ancestors came from a hunter-gatherer society, or an agricultural/pastoral one.

    I noticed though that you mentioned on another blog that xylitol raises your blood sugar. As a pre diabetic, (like being a little bit pregnant, IHMO) I eschew all refined carbs, and take it very easy with unrefined ones. I've experimented with the sugar alcohols, and while sorbitol in sugar-free pancake syrup spikes my BS astronomically (180-190!) in the mornings, maltitol (weirdly) effected by blood sugar not at all 1, 2, or three hours after ingesting it. I've yet to test formally test xylitol, but it does not seem to effect me. Is that weird, or what?

    Thanks for all you do.

    RE, the old posting from Galya above, I would say that, although my mother-in-law is quite overweight, she is constantly on the ,move, always working, even though she greatly enjoys all the Russian comfort foods. We can't overlook the genetic component of insulin sensitivity, and from I see, Russians seem to on average be blessed in that area. But lest we forget, Russian men die on average MUCH younger than their Western counterparts due to alcoholism, and a stubbornness not to see the Doctor until they are at death's door.

    Peace to all!

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